A Startup Club For Doctors Only

doctor entrepreneurs

Currently, the doctors decide how long they want to stay in the program, which is free, but that could change. “As we grow and look for funding, we’ll likely tie membership with a commitment to attending 80% of meetings and start charging fees,” she said. Those fees would potentially help Haas and Gueramy expand their program to other states. They also plan to start soliciting corporate sponsorships. Haas’ and Gueramy’s own experience as physicians-turned-entrepreneurs sparked the idea for their incubator. Haas, a rural family physician, and Gueramy, an orthopedic surgeon, invested $50,000 to launch DocbookMD in 2009. DocbookMD, which allows physicians to safely share encrypted patient information, grew out of their need for a more efficient communication system between doctors and institutions. It also includes a directory of area physicians and pharmacies. The app (available on Apple and Android devices) is free for doctors who are members of their state or county medical associations and available to hospitals and large physician groups for a fee. It is already used by more than 22,000 physicians in 39 states. “With DocbookMD, physicians can quickly consult with each other about test results and even look up another doctor for a patient,” said Gueramy. “This also saves patients’ time, money and a wasted trip to the ER.”

have a peek at this website http://money.cnn.com/2014/02/06/smallbusiness/doctor-entrepreneur-startup/index.html

Doctors’ Group Issues 1st Guidelines to Prevent Strokes in Women

They focus on birth control, pregnancy, depression and other risk factors that women face uniquely or more frequently than men do. The advice applies to patients like Denise Miller, who suffered a stroke last year that fooled doctors at two northeast Ohio hospitals before it was finally diagnosed at the Cleveland Clinic. She was 36 and had no traditional risk factors. “There was nothing to indicate I was going to have a stroke,” other than frequent migraines with aura dizziness or altered senses such as tingling, ringing ears or sensitivity to light, Miller said. Related Stories Too Much Sugar Could Cause Deadly Heart Problems These headaches are more common in women and the new guidelines issued Thursday flag them as a concern. Miller recovered but has some lingering numbness and vision problems. Each year, nearly 800,000 Americans have a new or recurrent stroke, which occurs when a blood vessel to the brain is blocked by a clot or bursts. Stroke is the third-leading cause of death for women and the fifth-leading cause for men. The key to surviving one and limiting disability is getting help fast, and recognizing symptoms such as trouble speaking, weakness or numbness in one arm, or drooping on one side of the face. Stroke risk rises with age, and women tend to live longer than men. Women are more likely to be living alone when they have a stroke, to have poorer recovery, and to need institutional care after one. Certain stroke risks are more common in women migraine with aura, obesity, an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, and metabolic syndrome a combo of problems including blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar. General guidelines for stroke prevention currently focus on controlling blood pressure and diabetes, quitting smoking, more exercise and healthy diets. The new ones add gender-specific advice, said Dr. Cheryl Bushnell, stroke chief at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

in the know http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/health/First-Guidelines-Issued-to-Prevent-Stroke-in-Women–244062051.html

This business incubator is for doctors only

Their ideas range from innovative medical devices to interactive websites. “Doctors come to this incubator typically because they have been batting around an idea that could help their patients or change the way medicine is currently being practiced,” said Haas. “Very few consider leaving medicine.” Each month, Gueramy and Haas invite lawyers, marketing execs, venture capitalists and business school professors to coach doctors about startup fundamentals like how to craft business plans, pitch ideas, draft patents and fund raise. Related: They ditched medical school to start a business “We toyed with the idea of mandatory meetings but haven’t done it because we know doctors are very busy,” said Haas. Currently, the doctors decide how long they want to stay in the program, which is free, but that could change. “As we grow and look for funding, we’ll likely tie membership with a commitment to attending 80% of meetings and start charging fees,” she said. Those fees would potentially help Haas and Gueramy expand their program to other states. They also plan to start soliciting corporate sponsorships. Haas’ and Gueramy’s own experience as physicians-turned-entrepreneurs sparked the idea for their incubator. Haas, a rural family physician, and Gueramy, an orthopedic surgeon, invested $50,000 to launch DocbookMD in 2009. DocbookMD, which allows physicians to safely share encrypted patient information, grew out of their need for a more efficient communication system between doctors and institutions. It also includes a directory of area physicians and pharmacies.

resource http://finance.yahoo.com/news/business-incubator-doctors-only-121800385.html

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