‘doctor Who’ Christmas Special Marks Matt Smith’s Farewell! Bbc Fans Say Goodbye To The Time Lord [video]

The doctor won’t see you? Analysts warn ObamaCare plans could resemble Medicaid

BBC Fans Say Goodbye To The Time Lord [VIDEO] By Carly Shields December 28, 2013 11:12 AM EST Doctor Who has said goodbye to the 11th doctor and now officially awaits the new season with its new doctor. (Photo: Doctor Who) Doctor Whofans officially said goodbye to the 11thDoctor on the famous BBC TV series on Christmas Day. Marking Matt Smith’s last time as the Time Lord, the much-loved show was filled with comedic lines, traumatic climaxes, life-and-death situations and lots of Daleks, the show’s famous robots. Follow Us As always, the ” Time of the Doctor “aired on Christmas. The British show that has been on TV for 50 years was the most watched show on television on Christmas day, with 10.2 million people tuning in. RELATED: Watch ‘Doctor Who’ Christmas Special 2013 Live Online So why did the producers choose this new doctor? Well, it happened so fast that it left some viewers confused as to what actually happened to the old doctor. Peter Capaldi is a Scottish actor and will now be playing Doctor 12 in season 8. (Photo: Reuters) Smith spent the holiday special trying to protect the town of Christmas on the planet of Trenzalore.He aged so fast that one moment he was hunched over the Tardis console and the next Peter Capaldi was standing just where Smith was before. There was no dramatic, drawn-out scene of Smith’s death, but simply a clean and painless five minutes. Capaldi, a Scottish actor, is now the 12th doctor on the British TV show. And a fun fact for all the Doctor Who lovers, Capaldi appeared in an earlier episode when the 10th doctor, David Tennant, was trying to save the world. But when Capaldi appeared on earth he could not adjust right away and instead was flapping and flailing due to his clumsiness, just like Smith, his predecessor. The new Time Lord didn’t even know how to fly the Tardis when he appeared on screen. Instead he turned to the bemused Jenna Coleman asking her: “Do you happen to know how to fly this thing?”

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Doctor Who has said goodbye to the 11th doctor and now officially awaits the new season with its new doctor. (Photo: Doctor Who)

1, analysts are warning that the plans are likely to give them access to fewer doctors and hospitals. So much so, they warn, that the system could begin to resemble Medicaid, the health care program for low-income Americans. “Indeed, I think this will eventually be like Medicaid,” said Merrill Matthews, director of the Council for Affordable Health Insurance. Matthews said the only way many insurers are going to be able to control costs is by “simply clamping down on the amount they are willing to pay.” Just as with Medicaid, analysts warn that if payments get too low, many doctors might start refusing to see patients. That will leave more and more patients jockeying to see fewer and fewer doctors. They emphasize, then, that having health insurance won’t necessarily translate into access to health care. “About half of the physicians in many communities refuse to take Medicaid patients because the payment system is just too low,” said James Capretta, of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. Doug Holtz-Eakin, former director of the Congressional Budget Office, suggested some of the plans on the exchanges are going in the same direction. “If you look at something where you get a dollar by treating a private payer, you get about 70 cents out of Medicare for that same treatment, you get about 55 cents out of Medicaid for that,” he said. He added: “You know, ObamCare started to look like Medicaid of the future, and in the Medicaid in the present, you can have the insurance but a doctor won’t see you.” By the end of March, the Obama administration hopes to increase the number of people on Medicaid by 9 million, and the number in private plans by 7 million. New Medicaid enrollments so far have far outpaced enrollments in private plans on the exchanges. But since Medicaid patients already have access to relatively few doctors, expanding that population while opening the door to lower payments for private insurance raises the prospect of rationing, as too many people chase too few doctors. “These networks are going to be jammed with people,” Robert Laszewski, president of Health Policy and Strategy Associates, said. “Far more than they’re treating now, and I don’t doubt that we’re going to have problems with access to these doctors. There just aren’t going to be enough of them.” For now, the Obama administration is trying to move past a year of some ups and many downs for its health care law, and encourage people to sign up during the final three months of open enrollment. President Obama said in his year-end press conference that enrollment has picked up considerably as problems with the federal exchange website have been addressed. “The law is working: More than half a million Americans have enrolled through HealthCare.gov in the first three weeks of December alone — and 800,000 more are on track to get Medicaid through their states,” he said in an email message on Sunday. Obama continued to stress that the law is providing health insurance to those previously unable to get it. “Now, thousands of Americans are signing up for coverage every day. That matters. It means financial security for families all across the country. It means freedom from the fear that one illness or accident might cost you everything you’ve worked so hard to build.” Fox News’ Jim Angle contributed to this report.

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Doctors’ House Calls Possible Via Technology

Dr. Luis Hernandez, Pain Management Specialist, Joins Medical Staff

email

It’s a dialogue.

The new portability of telemedicine could allow people and health care professionals to link to each other from wherever they are.

Cunningham said the health centers had previously used a substantial federal grant to purchase an expensive telemonitor unit. But advances in consumer digital technology have dramatically reduced the price of telemedicine.

The software that’s now available allows for very meaningful video connection without an expensive Polycom unit, he said.

Long-distance telemedicine can be traced back to the Civil War, when casualty figures and medicine supply orders were reported via telegraph, according to a 1996 article in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association. But the first modern telemedicine systems were developed by NASA scientists who sought to monitor physiological functions such as heart rates, blood pressure and respiration during the first manned space flights.

One of telemedicine’s earliest goals of telemedicine has been to connect top-notch medical professionals to patients in remote geographic areas. It’s an enduring objective that has driven much of its use in the North Coast.

When Dr. Javeed Siddiqui, an infectious disease specialist, first began providing telemedicine services to Sonoma Valley Hospital in 2007, telemedicine units and broadband services such as T1 lines were extremely expensive.

Siddiqui provides infectious disease consultations to Sonoma Valley Hospital. The hospital also links up to a UC Davis specialist for pediatric emergency care and an acute stroke specialist at Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco.

Siddiqui, who later co-founded TeleMed2U, said telemedicine became less cost prohibitive once it freed itself from expensive telemonitors and other legacy units. Also, he said, the adoption of telemedicine platforms that can run on any computer operating system made it possible to use devices such as laptops, tablets and even cellphones for medical consultations.

It’s not about the device, Siddiqui said.

The platform that allows this type of connectivity is provided by the nonprofit California Telehealth Network, which recently teamed up with video conferencing firms Arkadin and Vidyo. The joint effort allows network members, which include community clinics and critical-access hospitals such as Sonoma Valley Hospital, to connect patients and providers using a standard wired or wireless Internet connection.

We bring them things that allow them to connect to resources in Northern California that are not easily accessible. We help save them money, leveraging economies of scale, said Eric Brown, the California Telehealth Network’s president and CEO.

Mark Noble, senior director of product marketing for Vidyo, said that nationally there has been a perfect storm brewing for rapid adoption of telemedicine. Politicians in Washington eager to grapple with the skyrocketing costs of health care are turning to telemedicine, he said.

The political climate has become right, Noble said. The cost of health care has to be brought under control.

Meanwhile, the North Coast’s largest health care providers, Kaiser Permanente and Sutter Health, continue to adopt telemedicine in new ways.

At Kaiser, the video visit is directly integrated with the provider’s system of electronic medical records. In the near future, some Kaiser members will be able to conduct video visits using mobile devices that use either Apple’s iOS or Google’s Android operating system.

This is a huge deal. From a technology standpoint, this is one of our biggest operational improvements to our members, said Dr. Hari Lakshmanan, a physical medicine specialist and Kaiser’s assistant physician in chief for technology.

Lakshmanan said Kaiser is working to ensure the service has a secure firewall and other safety features before we roll it out to all our members.

Sutter Medical Center in Santa Rosa, which was one of the North Coast’s early adopters of telemedicine in the intensive-care setting, has begun using the technology for acute stroke care.

Dr.

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B.C. medical specialists struggle to find work

The report doesn’t address the issue of whether there are too many specialists for the Canadian health care system, in which operating room time and budgets are fixed. But it makes it clear that doctors are competing for resources. The report also pinpoints reasons why newly certified specialists are having trouble finding work: older doctors are delaying retirement; established surgeons are protecting their precious (often only one day a week) operating room time so young doctors aren’t getting the hospital/surgical positions they covet; and a lack of cohesion in medical resource planning and coordination between medical schools, governments and hospital or health care authorities. As well, there are relatively new categories of health professionals encroaching on doctors’ territory, such as advanced practice nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Respondents to the survey were graduates of Canada’s 17 medical schools and/or Canadian residency training programs in fields such as cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, nuclear medicine, ophthalmology, radiation oncology, urology, critical care, gastroenterology, general surgery, hematology and medical microbiology. The report does not include data on family doctors. While about one in five specialists or subspecialists said they are having challenges finding jobs, another 22 per cent of newly certified specialists said they are taking locum positions or other various part-time positions. Locums assume another doctor’s duties during holidays or extended absences. In the survey, 40 per cent said they weren’t happy they had to do that. Dr. Dave Snadden, associate dean of education at UBC medical school, said since the report is based on a survey with a response rate of about onethird (43 per cent in B.C.) of 4,233 doctors polled, it has to be seen as less than perfect from a research methodology perspective. He defended UBC’s approach to matching residency training positions with community needs and noted that is one reason why UBC has been pushing for more and more family medicine residencies.

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13, 2013 1:01 a.m. Get it to go … Email Headlines Sign up for our newsletter and have the top headlines from your community delivered right to your inbox. Dec. 10, 2013 4:58 p.m. Get it to go … Email Headlines Sign up for our newsletter and have the top headlines from your community delivered right to your inbox. Dec. 13, 2013 1 p.m. Get it to go … Email Headlines Sign up for our newsletter and have the top headlines from your community delivered right to your inbox. Get it to go … Email Headlines Sign up for our newsletter and have the top headlines from your community delivered right to your inbox. Dr.

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Doctors Negotiate With Ministers

Khaled Samir, the treasurer of the Doctors Syndicate and one of those negotiating on the doctors behalf, said they are continuing and that there is consensus and response. But Samir added that none of what was discussed was drafted as a law yet. We are working day and night to be able to present the cabinet with a proposal, he said, adding that the negotiations are set to be concluded on Tuesday. In October, the Ministries of Health and Finance announced the finalisation of a new draft law , the Medical Incentives Law,which would increase the salaries of professionals employed in the public health sector. However, many doctors expressed dissatisfaction with it. State run Al-Ahram reported that the draft Medical Incentives Law would grant freshly graduated doctors a gross salary of only EGP 1,800 which falls short of the previously proposed draft Staff Law, with a proposed monthly income of EGP 3,000. Doctors have been pushing for the draft Staff Law for months. It organises financial, administrative and technical matters for all professionals in the healthcare sector, not just doctors. The new Secretary General of the syndicate Mona Mina, a founding member of Doctors Without Rights called on Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi and Maha Al-Rabat to immediately intervene to implement the draft Staff Law, ahead of a strike scheduled for 1 January. Midterm elections held in the syndicate last week have secured for theIndependent Movement 11 out of 12 contested seats. Traditionally, the Muslim Brotherhood succeeded in syndicate elections but this time, they only won a single seat. The new syndicate board met for the first time on Thursday, in a meeting attended by Al-Rabat. The syndicate announced after the meeting that the negotiations would be held throughout this week. The syndicate warned on Thursday to strike, as per a decision made by the syndicates General Assembly, if negotiations lead to unsatisfactory results. On 6 December, the syndicate held an emergency session of the General Assembly. During the assembly, doctors unanimously voted to back the draft Staff Law and agreed to start a partial strike on 1 January. The strike would follow the same technique as the one carried out by doctors in 2012.

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Doctors producer Peter Lloyd on 2014 storylines

Sarah Moyle as Valerie Pitman in Doctors

Instead we’re going to be looking at what makes Heston tick. He’s buying Julia’s house and feels like he’s moving on to pastures new, but he may not like what he finds” Can you give us any other character gossip? “I’m pleased to say that Jimmi will be getting some romance in his life, and she’s going to take him down some interesting avenues. Chris is going to be leaving us in suitably dramatic fashion, and poor Jimmi is going to be dragged into this story too, however hard he tries to resist. Jimmi is put in a pretty impossible situation, and we all know that he doesn’t like being trapped, so this one’s going to be interesting. “For Mandy, there’s a big shock coming, and hopefully a shock for the audience too. And Kevin’s not going to escape it either. Keep your eyes peeled” Will the proposed ‘super-surgery’ continue to pose a threat to The Mill next year? “Sadly, or perhaps happily, economic hardships (as well as some rather troublesome news) have ended the plans for a Superpractice for now. But we’re always looking for outside threats to the surgery, so this could rear its ugly head once more” After they bonded recently, would you ever consider turning Zara and Emma into more of a dynamic duo working together? “I think they’re going to have their moments, there’s certainly chemistry there, but equally, they’re going to come into conflict too – they’re both alpha females and sparks are going to fly. With the departure of Chris, we want Emma to spread her wings a little and have a bit of fun – she’s been worrying a lot and grieving, and her work at the police station is serious stuff.

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Canadian Association Of Gastroenterology: Open Letter To Canadians

You’re not alone. One in five Canadians waiting to see a gastroenterologist misses work because of digestive disorders. One in four Canadians waiting to see a gastroenterologist is affected in his or her day-to-day functioning. One in three Canadians waiting to see a gastroenterologist experiences anxiety as a direct result of digestive problems. Canadian gastroenterologists and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) know Canadians have reason to worry. Digestive diseases represent 15% of the total economic burden of Canadian health costs and cause a loss of productivity reaching $1.14 billion annually. That’s more than mental, cardiovascular, respiratory or central nervous system diseases. Meanwhile, Canadians have told Statistics Canada that waiting lists and wait times rank among their top health concerns. Despite the harsh realities surrounding digestive disease, Canadians must wait an inordinate amount of time for gastro-intestinal consultations and access to specialized testing. Case in point: 25% of patients with alarm symptoms, indicators of disease such as cancer, are forced to wait 4 months before their case is seen by a specialist. That’s far longer than the 3 weeks Canadians have told us that they’re willing to wait. Frankly, four months is unacceptable. It is time we got our priorities straight. Surprisingly, in developing its wait list reform of the Canadian health care system, Paul Martin’s government overlooked digestive disease. The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology has sent a call to action to Prime Minister Paul Martin, urging him to include digestive disease as a health-care priority and ensure Canadian patients obtain necessary and timely access to our specialists. Canadian gastroenterologists are already out of the starting block.

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Gastroenterologists release new safety guidelines

In this Oct. 3, 2007, file photo released by the University of Wisconsin Medical School shows a virtual colonoscopy, a 3-D image that was computer-generated from a series of X-rays taken by a CT scanner. (AP Photo/ Courtesy of Dr. Perry J. Pickhardt/ University of Wisconsin Medical School, file)

– Canada’s gastroenterologists have new guidelines on safety and quality indicators to help with the more than 1.6 million procedures performed each year, their association announced Monday. Although the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology has guidelines around credentials and training, there was a void in other areas. “If one looks at the sort of totality of endoscopy service delivery, particularly from a patient point of view — which is access to services, rapid access, high quality services, feedback, and an ability to respond to how they perceive endoscopy service delivery — then there really was nothing in place,” said Dr. David Armstrong, chair of the endoscopy committee and the consensus guideline committee. Endoscopy is used to detect or screen for a number of diseases and involves examining the colon or digestive tract using a long, thin tube with a light and camera attached. Last October, about 6,800 Ottawa residents were sent letters from public health officials after it was found that a non-hospital clinic wasn’t following some procedures involving cleaning and infection prevention. The letters indicated the patients might have been exposed to hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV. Armstrong said he likes to think the presence of these guidelines would have made a difference in the Ottawa situation. “That’s really because one of the challenges for endoscopy — and it’s in and out of hospitals — has been that if there isn’t a framework to say how things should be monitored and how they should be delivered, it’s difficult to know how much or how closely to monitor things, and what actually are the standards,” Armstrong said in an interview from Hamilton, where he’s an associate professor of medicine at McMaster University. “So I think guidelines that say what should be monitored and what processes have to be in place really from a patient point of view and knowledge that there are tools available to monitor the way that services are delivered and to use as a basis for quality improvement programs would have made a big difference.” Armstrong indicated that it used to be felt that washing the scope and then doing a manual cleaning was sufficient. “And the trouble is there are times when that isn’t sufficient. It’s also important to ensure that all of the endoscopy manufacturers’ instructions and the automatic cleaning equipment instructions are followed, that there’s regular checks of the equipment and the water supply and the filtration and everything else.” It’s something of an undertaking, he noted. “And so to know that those have to be checked regularly and incorporated into all the other quality processes, I think is going to be key as we go forward — particularly as volumes increase.” The new Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy were developed by a group of 35 Canadian, European and U.S.-based participants, the association said. They reviewed more than two decades’ worth of research to develop their recommendations. Focus groups and patients in Calgary, Hamilton and Montreal were also involved, and questioned about their concerns around the procedures, Armstrong said. Related Links

full article http://www.ctvnews.ca/gastroenterologists-release-new-safety-guidelines-1.758456

Health Canada Approves HUMIRA® (adalimumab) for the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis (UC)

There are approximately 233,000 Canadians living with IBD, and 104,000 of them live with UC. Approximately 4,500 new cases of UC are diagnosed every year1. “The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada is committed to finding cures for ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease,” statesCCFC Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Kevin Glasgow . “While we work on finding cures, we are committed to improving the lives of children and adults affected by inflammatory bowel disease. IBD treatments approved by Health Canada will increase access, provide more treatment options, and improve the quality of life for Canadians living with ulcerative colitis.” Canadians prescribed HUMIRA for UC will have the opportunity to be enrolled in PROGRESS, the HUMIRA support program, which provides a wide range of services including insurance, injection, education and ongoing support. “The approval of HUMIRA for ulcerative colitis is a testament to the growing need for targeted treatments in Canada ,” says Felipe Pastrana , General Manager, AbbVie Canada. “With HUMIRA and with initiatives such as the AbbVie IBD Scholarship Program, we want to empower people living with IBD and provide them with all the right tools to succeed.” HUMIRA is also approved in Canada in adults for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Crohn’s disease (CD), and psoriasis (Ps), as well as in children aged 4 to 17 years for the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and in pediatric patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) 13 to 17 of age, 40kg. 1 The Impact of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Canada: 2012 Final Report and Recommendations, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada. http://www.isupportibd.ca/pdf/ccfc-ibd-impact-report-2012.pdf About HUMIRA HUMIRA resembles antibodies normally found in the body. It works by blocking TNF-, a protein that, when produced in excess, plays a central role in the inflammatory responses of many immune-mediated diseases. HUMIRA is one of the most comprehensively studied biologics available. The overall clinical database for HUMIRA spans 15 years across multiple indications, including 71 clinical trials with over 23,000 patients. HUMIRA is approved in 90 countries and used by over 670,000 patients worldwide. Any medicines can have side effects.

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B.c. Medical Specialists Struggle To Find Work

The report also pinpoints reasons why newly certified specialists are having trouble finding work: older doctors are delaying retirement; established surgeons are protecting their precious (often only one day a week) operating room time so young doctors arenat getting the hospital/surgical positions they covet; and a lack of cohesion in medical resource planning and coordination between medical schools, governments and hospital or health care authorities. As well, there are relatively new categories of health professionals encroaching on doctorsa territory, such as advanced practice nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Respondents to the survey were graduates of Canadaas 17 medical schools and/or Canadian residency training programs in fields such as cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, nuclear medicine, ophthalmology, radiation oncology, urology, critical care, gastroenterology, general surgery, hematology and medical microbiology. The report does not include data on family doctors. While about one in five specialists or subspecialists said they are having challenges finding jobs, another 22 per cent of newly certified specialists said they are taking locum positions or other various part-time positions. Locums assume another doctoras duties during holidays or extended absences. In the survey, 40 per cent said they werenat happy they had to do that. The report draws attention to the fact that more than half of the respondents said they hadnat received any career counselling about the most promising job prospects while doing their training. They also complained that there are inadequate avenues for finding out where the jobs might be. Cunningham said since taxpayers are largely sponsoring medical education, there should be a fix to the problem through better planning of medical human resource needs. aWe need a more robust national/provincial system and thereas a really great need for more career counselling,a he said. Dr. Dave Snadden, associate dean of education at UBC medical school, said since the report is based on a survey with a response rate of about one-third (43 per cent in B.C.) of 4,233 doctors polled, it has to be seen as less than perfect from a research methodology perspective. He defended UBCas approach to matching residency training positions with community needs and noted that is one reason why UBC has been pushing for more and more family medicine residencies.

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Non-specialist psychosocial interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders

If non-specialists were able to deliver such care, more children may be able to receive treatment. In this week’s PLOS Medicine, Brian Reichow (Yale Child Study Center, University of Connecticut Health Center, US) and colleagues from the World Health Organization conducted a systematic review of studies of non-specialist psychosocial interventions for children and adolescents with intellectual disability or lower functioning autism spectrum disorders. In a search of several international databases for studies published through June 2013, the authors found 34 articles describing 29 studies (including 15 randomized controlled trials) involving 1,305 participants that met their inclusion criteria. The studies evaluated behavior analytic techniques, cognitive rehabilitation, training, and support, and parent training interventions. The authors found that for behavior analytic interventions, the best outcomes were shown for developmental and daily skills; cognitive rehabilitation , training, and support were found to be most effective for improving developmental outcomes; and parent training interventions to be most effective for improving developmental, behavioral, and family outcomes. The study limitations included that in research of this type it is difficult to mask individuals to the intervention, and therefore the studies are susceptible to performance bias, and the fact that few studies were conducted in low and middle income countries . The authors state, “Overall, the outcomes of the studies included in this review show that non-specialist providers can deliver effective treatments to children with intellectual disabilities or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders Our findings that psychosocial interventions can be effective when delivered by nonspecialist providers has much relevance for improving access to care for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders who live in both [high income countries] and [low and middle income countries], but it is useful especially in low-resource settings.” In an accompanying Perspective, Mashudat Bello-Mojeed and Muideen Bakare (Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria) (uninvolved in the study) discuss the implications of the study for care of children with intellectual disability or lower functioning autism spectrum disorders in low income countries . They state, “With under-five child mortality declining in resource-poor countries, an increasing number of children will live on to experience an increasing burden of neurodevelopmental disorders while the family shares a huge burden of caregiving Interventions provided by non-specialist care providers could help alleviate the scarcity of specialist care by task shifting and potentially also help reduce the risk of burn-out among existing specialists.” They conclude, “Ultimately, non-specialist psychosocial interventions for [neurodevelopmental disorders] will require advocacy and government support in [low and middle income countries], where mortality is given priority over morbidity and disability.” More information: Reichow B, Servili C, Yasamy MT, Barbui C, Saxena S (2013) Non-Specialist Psychosocial Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability or Lower-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review. PLoS Med 10(12): e1001572. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001572 Provided by Public Library of Science

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Medical Specialists Have Trouble Finding Work

aThis is particularly troubling. These individuals have spent years training, but Canadians continue to wait for timely care.a The report warned of a potential abrain draina a doctors leaving Canada to find jobs a and a abrain wastea in underemployed surgeons going to office practice, for example. aThe research reveals one big piece that weave been missing all along,a FrAchette said: Lots of specialists need essential medical resources to practice a hospital beds, operating rooms, operating room nurses, support staff in intensive care units a and these aare very sensitive to the state of the economy.a Frozen health budgets affect hospital operating budgets, which, in turn, affect specialty medicine. As a result, physicians are competing for shrinking resources. Frechette cited her own 14-months wait for a hip replacement. Her surgeon had one operating day a week a and lots of patients on his wait-list. aSo if we increase the number of orthopedic surgeons without increasing the number of resources available to them, my waits are still going to continue,a she said. Independently of this report, the federation of Quebec medical residents last month warned that 30 per cent of their graduates have yet to find suitable work in the last two months of their residency. Young Quebec doctors are accepting part-time positions to stay in their chosen fields, the federation said, and also health jobs that do not make use of their medical or surgical specialties. This unprecedented employment study by the Royal College, undertaken after several of its medical societies reported in 2010 that their specialists were jobless or underemployed, found that most of these MDs without permanent jobs were going for extra training or taking part-time, fill-in positions. Early signs came from orthopedic surgeons, who reported that nine per cent of their ranks across Canada were not working. Slightly more than half of 176 orthopedic specialists a 56 per cent a who graduated between 2006 to 2011, found full-time work, 35 per cent extended their training in fellowship or postgraduate degrees because they could not find a job. Of the nine per cent who were jobless, 69 per cent took on-call shifts and 31 per cent had no work at all. And cardiac surgeons reported that among 62 Canadian graduates between 2002 and 2008 a 98 per cent said finding work was adifficult or extremely difficult,a 27 per cent extended their training while 34 per cent considered themselves underemployed. Frechetteas team conducted about 50 interviews with physicians, health-care leaders, planners, educators and residents, plus sent online surveys to medical specialists who were certified (had successfully completed national exams) in the past two years.

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An Eye For The Bigger Picture: It’s Time For A Medical Specialist With An Overview Of Patients’ Needs

A few showers easing. Chance storm. Cookies must be enabled. Enabling Cookies in Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9 + Open the Internet Browser Click Tools (or “gear” icon at top right hand corner) > Internet Options > Privacy > Advanced Check Override automatic cookie handling For First-party Cookies and Third-party Cookies click Accept Click OK and OK Click Tools > Options > Privacy Select Privacy > Content settings Check ‘Allow local data to be set (recommended)’ Click ‘Done’ Under ‘History’ select Firefox will: ‘Use custom settings for history’ Check ‘Accept cookies from sites’ and then check ‘Accept third-party cookies’ Click OK Enabling Cookies in Google Chrome Open the Google Chrome browser Chrome > Preferences Click ‘Show advanced settings’ at the bottom. Under Privacy select ‘Content settings’ Under ‘Cookies’ select ‘Allow local data to be set (recommended)’ Click ‘OK’ Under ‘Block cookies’ check ‘Never’ Enabling Cookies in Mobile Safari (iPhone, iPad) Go to the Home screen by pressing the Home button or by unlocking your phone/iPad Select the Settings icon. Select Safari from the settings menu. Select ‘accept cookies’ from the safari menu. Select ‘from visited’ from the accept cookies menu. Press the home button to return the the iPhone home screen. Select the Safari icon to return to Safari. Before the cookie settings change will take effect, Safari must restart. To restart Safari press and hold the Home button (for around five seconds) until the iPhone/iPad display goes blank and the home screen appears.

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Rickets Making A Comeback In The Uk, Doctors Say

Apples Sweet or tart, apples are satisfying eaten raw or baked into a delicious dish. Just be… 2. Brussels sprouts Made the correct way, these veggies taste divine. They have a mild, somewhat bitter… 3. Parsnips Though these veggies may resemble carrots, they have a lighter color and sweeter, almost… 4. Pears The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out… 5. Rutabaga

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UK Doctors Planning to Strike

A vast majority of GPs, hospital consultants and junior doctors voted in favor of the suspension of non-urgent care. The strike is in response to changes in pension and pay standards that are expected to go into effect in 2015 in England and Wales. The changes include the age of retirement, which would move up from 65 to 68, as well as raising the amount medical professionals pay into the pension system. Some doctors are very critical of the move to strike. BBC picked up the story of an BMA member, Dr. Dan Poulter, who decided to quit the organization after the decision to strike. The BBC quoted Poulter as saying: This is going to damage the reputation of the medical profession and its going to hurt patients. In 2009-10, the average GP was earning 106,000 and, under the new scheme the government set up, the average doctor, on retirement, will receive a pension of 68,000 a year. We need to be able to afford the pensions and afford to look after people in terms of funding the NHS and its important that doctors pay their fair share along with everyone else. Health Secretary Andrew Lansley has also stated that the public will not sympathize with the doctors strike. NHS officials argue that the doctors are dragging patients into the middle of a debate and endangering effective and efficient care. Furthermore, many officials claim that the pension system for doctors in the UK is one of the best in the world, retaining the same comprehensive pension for new doctors starting their work this year. Admittedly, medical professionals tend to pay into the pension system at higher amounts, but this measure is set to guarantee that all retirees will receive the 68,000 pension at the retirement age. The strike also comes in the wake of potential and vast changes to medical establishment in the UK. The BMA has been especially critical of Prime Minister David Camerons proposed changes to the NHS system over the last few months. Many doctors fear that Camerons hopes for change involve a marketization of the medical field, which will be detrimental to patients and doctors alike.

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‘doctor Who’ Anniversary Show Gets Big Ratings In U.k.

Three Doctors

According to the BBC, the 50th-anniversary Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor special on Saturday was seen by 10.61 million. Post to Facebook ‘Doctor Who’ anniversary show gets big ratings in U.K. on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/IbWmhY Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. 2 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs ‘Doctor Who’ anniversary show gets big ratings in U.K. Brian Truitt, USA TODAY 1:49 p.m. EST November 24, 2013 More than 10 million people in the UK tuned into the episode with Matt Smith and David Tennant. The “Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor” special with Matt Smith, David Tennant and John Hurt garnered big ratings in the UK. (Photo: Adrian Rogers) ‘Doctor Who’ anniversary special garners big ratings in the U.K. on Saturday ‘The Day of the Doctor’ featured Matt Smith, David Tennant and John Hurt Special aired 50 years to the day after the first ‘Doctor Who’ broadcast SHARE 70 CONNECT 17 TWEET 2 COMMENTEMAILMORE British TV viewers turned out in big numbers to celebrate their homegrown sci-fi hero. According to the BBC, the 50th-anniversary Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor special on Saturday night was seen by 10.61 million people, besting the British version of X Factor that had an audience of 7.7 million.

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Australia Top Doc: Physician Assistant Use Too Risky

Health Workforce Australia report gives the nod to physician assistants

A plan to introduce some physician assistants to the country’s health system has Australian Medical Association president Rosanna Capolingua very upsetabout patient safety, of course. THE head of Australia’s peak medical body has criticised a plan to introduce US-style physicians’ assistants who would carry out less complex medical procedures, saying it puts patients at greater risk and could deny junior doctors training opportunities. Queensland Health Minister Stephen Robertson yesterday released the five sites for a pilot program to train doctors’ assistants, who would perform the procedures under the guidance of a qualified doctor. The pilot is based on a scheme developed in the US and has been trialled in countries including Canada and Britain. Australian Medical Association president Rosanna Capolingua said that, although assistants would work under a doctor’s supervision at all times, their use in surgical procedures could compromise patient safety. “The physician’s assistant understands how to do the task and they may be useful as a ‘tool’ but, for our own junior doctors, they need to have that holistic training and experience as well,” she said. “Patient safety must always be our first priority, not just the delivery of a service to a patient.” Doesn’t sound like Dr. Capolingua is going tomake a great teammate. The nurses aren’t thrilled, either. Beth Mohle from the Queensland Nurses Union said the Government should spend the money expanding the role of existing nursing staff. “They’re not actually testing physicians’ assistants against positions like nurse practitioners,” she said.

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The report clearly outlines positive impact that the physician assistant will have on the Australian health workforce and the overwhelming support of the rural and remote health sector. To date, most opposition to the Physician Assistant role has been based on a poor understanding of this model of healthcare, which this report confirms. The contents of the report provide a clear and detailed description of the role of Physician Assistant, which should lead to a greater understanding of the position. So, what is the next step? Well the next step is in fact already happening and as can be seen from the recent events in Tasmania, there is a desire in some states to commence the introduction of a Physician Assistant. Whilst the work being conducted in individual Australian states should continue, the Physician Assistant should also be considered at the national level. This report echoes the sentiments of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) that the profession should be registered nationally under AHPRA, and likely administered by the Australian Medical Board. With much of the professional registration requirements having already been developed and the professional oversight of ACRRM ensuring the validity of Physician Assistant education and continuing professional development programs, national registration can be commenced almost immediately. There are at present over 30 Australian Physician Assistant graduates, with a new cohort of students having commenced this year. As the HWA report identifies, the Physician Assistant will have a positive impact in the health workforce, so now it is time to get started and introduce this new health professional. Ben Stock was a member of the first cohort of Australian Physician Assistants to graduate in 2011.

blog site http://blogs.crikey.com.au/croakey/2012/08/24/health-workforce-australia-report-gives-the-nod-to-physician-assistants/